Military History | How To Make War | Wars Around the World Rules of Use How to Behave on an Internet Forum
Pakistan Discussion Board
   Return to Topic Page
Subject: Missile capability -- India vs Pakistan: Who is superior?
Shah Rukh    9/26/2006 4:30:40 PM
AT A time when the armed forces of India and Pakistan stand eyeball to eyeball on the border, the latter has test-fired three ballistic missiles ? Ghauri, Ghaznavi and Abdali ? in the last few days. An analysis indicates that its motive could be three-fold. One, the event is aimed at its domestic audience: To silence the ruling General's critics (political, religious and others) who have been accusing him of having brought their country to the edge of a precipice endangering its very existence. Two, to tell the world, particularly the US, to do everything possible to restrain India from launching a military strike on Pakistan, even if it is a limited one, and forcing an international intervention on the Jammu and Kashmir dispute. And, finally, to demonstrate its non-conventional (nuclear, to be precise) strike power and send a message to India that Pakistan is ready to use weapons of mass destruction if a war breaks out. Pakistan is perceived to have acquired missile capability in the late 1980s. Three major factors ? the easy availability of Chinese missiles and missile-related technologies, its inability to obtain the delivery of all its F-16 fighters from the US and the success of India's missile development programme ? were to be the main reasons for Pakistan's missile acquisitions. Following the latest tests, Pakistan's missile arsenal now consists of the Hatf ? I, II ,III, IV, V,VI, and so on. The Hatf-I is a single-stage solid propellant missile with a range of 60-80 km and a payload capacity of 500 kg. It was first flight-tested in 1989 and a larger 100 km range variant was most recently test-fired in early 2000. It is believed to be in service in limited numbers. The Haft-II, also known as Abdali, is a solid-propellant ballistic missile with a range of 180 km and a payload capacity of 500 kg. Abdali was first test-fired in February 1989 and, more recently, on May 28. The Hatf-III, also known as the Ghaznavi, is a solid fuel short-range ballistic missile with a range of 290 km and a payload capacity of 500 kg. This missile, which closely resembles the Chinese M-11 missile, was for the first time test-fired on May 26. The Hatf-IV, also called Shaheen-I, has a range of 750 km and a payload capacity of 700 kg. This solid fuel missile, which is based on the Chinese M-9 missile design, was first flight-tested in April 1999. Shaheen-I is reportedly to have entered serial production in mid 1998. Hatf-V, also named Ghauri, is a single-stage liquid fuel IRBM with a range of 1,500 km and a payload capacity of 700 kg. This missile was first test-fired in April 1998. There is another version, Ghauri-II, a liquid fuel, two- stage IRBM (intermediate range ballistic missile) with a claimed range of 2,300 km. It was first flight-tested in April 1999. The Ghauris are believed to be derived from the North Korean Nodong missile. A longer range, two-stage solid fuel missile Hatf-VI, also called Shaheen-II, was unveiled during the Pakitan Day Parade on March 23, 2000. This missile, which is yet to be test-fired, is likely to have a range of 2,500 km with a 1,000 kg payload. Beside the Hatf series, longer range missiles ? Tipu and Haider ? have also been reported. India began a comprehensive missile development programme, the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme (IGMDP), in 1983. With an initial budget of Rs 380 crore, the programme envisaged "to take up simultaneously the design and development of five missiles which would provide the nation a comprehensive missile-based Defence umbrella within ten years''. The five missiles include the short-range surface-to-air missile Trishul; the surface-to-air missile, Akash; the smokeless high-energy anti-tank guided missile Nag; the surface-to-surface missile Prithvi, and the intermediate range missile Agni. Of these, only Prithvi and Agni are ballistic missiles. Prithvi is a single stage, road mobile, liquid fuel battle-field support missile. This 8.5 m short-range missile, costing Rs 5 crore a piece, was first test-fired in February 1988. Several variants of the missile have been developed. Prithvi-I, or the Army version, has the maximum range of 150 km and a payload capacity of 1,000 kg. This missile has been produced and inducted into the Army. Prithvi-II, or the Air-force version, has a range of 250 km with a warhead weight of 500-700 kg. The development work on this missile is complete. The Prithvi-III, for the Navy, and also called Dhanush, has a range of 350 km and a warhead weight of 1,000 kg. This missile is under development. The intermediate range Agni is India's second ballistic missile. It is a two-stage IRBM 18.4 m long and 1.3 body diameter. It has a range of 1,000 km and a payload capacity of 1,000 kg. It is based on first stage solid and second stage liquid fuel configuration. As an IRBM, Agni provides many battle-field advantages such as better interception rate, sp
 
Quote    Reply

Show Only Poster Name and Title     Newest to Oldest
TopGun       9/30/2006 8:41:19 PM
Are the missile programs of these countries advanced, because the ranges which u mention dont seem to that extraordinary when considering that Western European, the US and even China have had Long range ICBM missiles since the late 60's or are maybe Pakstan/India dont need such a requiremnt. do any of the countries have ICBM capability? if not are they in development and when will they be?
 
Quote    Reply

pulkit_patriot       12/27/2006 2:52:51 AM

Are the missile programs of these countries advanced, because the ranges which u mention dont seem to that extraordinary when considering that Western European, the US and even China have had Long range ICBM missiles since the late 60's or are maybe Pakstan/India dont need such a requiremnt. do any of the countries have ICBM capability? if not are they in development and when will they be?



India has an ICBM under development: surya with a range of about 5000 to 8000 KM and surya-2 with a range of 12000 to 20000KM. link
 
Quote    Reply

aszxaszx       10/13/2010 7:44:07 AM
Pakistan is ready to launch Omer 1 ICRBM missile which has max.range of 12000km, but waiting for the right time
 
Quote    Reply

Ismail    why are we still talking about this?   5/18/2011 8:44:23 AM
Folks I had predicted some years ago -- right here in this forum by the way -- that a day will come when one of India / Pakistan will be able to nuke the other to kingdom come and the other will not: as in then there will be more than peace: South Asia will not only re-unite (to some extent at least) but will also incorporate several other countries around it.

Tell me if I am wrong when I say that India can currently deliver its warheads only 150kms into Pakistan, while Pakistan can blow it up like water in frying oil. DON'T talk about what is not ready to launch -- I am saying if we launch now -- it is only Lahore we'll have to evacuate first!

I do not see the wisdom in remaining as soft as my country is. yet against america i agree its like a weak and otherwise unarmed chap against a bully with a pistol -- with BOTH of them carrying vest bombs. India for the moment is but a sitting duck -- IF we press the trigger on time
 
Quote    Reply

mullahkiller    Mad Paki   8/15/2011 11:40:46 AM
Another mad pakistani, living in a fantasy world. Go update your self about India's missile capability. Bloody mullah from the 10th century.
 
Quote    Reply

phrank       8/15/2011 2:42:40 PM
I will make a prediction!   This thread will soon be full of fanboys of both India and Pakistan going at it.
 
Quote    Reply



 Latest
 News
 
 Most
 Read
 
 Most
 Commented
 Hot
 Topics