The Strategypage is a comprehensive summary of military news and affairs.
December 20, 2014

CIC 440

Past Issues
CIC 439
CIC 438
CIC 437
CIC 436
CIC 435
CIC 434
CIC 433
CIC 432
CIC 431
CIC 430
CIC 429
CIC 428
CIC 427
CIC 426
CIC 425
CIC 424
CIC 423
CIC 422
CIC 421
CIC 420
CIC 419
CIC 418
CIC 417
CIC 416
CIC 415
CIC 414
CIC 413
CIC 412
CIC 411
CIC 410
CIC 409
CIC 408
CIC 407
CIC 406
CIC 405
CIC 404
CIC 403
CIC 402
CIC 401
CIC 400
CIC 399
CIC 398
CIC 397
CIC 396
CIC 395
CIC 394
CIC 393
CIC 392
CIC 391
CIC 390
CIC 389
CIC 388
CIC 387
CIC 386
CIC 385
CIC 384
CIC 383
CIC 382
CIC 381
CIC 380
CIC 379
CIC 378
CIC 377
CIC 375
CIC 374
CIC 373
CIC 372
CIC 371
CIC 370
CIC 369
CIC 368
CIC 367
CIC 366
CIC 365
CIC 364
CIC 363
CIC 362
CIC 361
CIC 360
CIC 359
CIC 358
CIC 357
CIC 356
CIC 355
CIC 354
CIC 353
CIC 352
CIC 351
CIC 350
CIC 349
CIC 348
CIC 347
CIC 346
CIC 345
CIC 344
CIC 343
CIC 342
CIC 341
CIC 340
CIC 339
CIC 338
CIC 337
CIC 336
CIC 335
CIC 334
CIC 333
CIC 332
CIC 331
CIC 330
CIC 329
CIC 328
CIC 327
CIC 326
CIC 325
CIC 324
CIC 323
CIC 322
CIC 321
CIC 320
CIC 319
CIC 318
CIC 317
CIC 316
CIC 315
CIC 314
CIC 313
CIC 312
CIC 311
CIC 310
CIC 309
CIC 308
CIC 307
CIC 306
CIC 305
CIC 304
CIC 303
CIC 302
CIC 301
CIC 300
CIC 299
CIC 298
CIC 297
CIC 296
CIC 295
CIC 294
CIC 293
CIC 292
CIC 291
CIC 290
CIC 289
CIC 288
CIC 287
CIC 286
CIC 285
CIC 284
CIC 283
CIC 282
CIC 281
CIC 280
CIC 279
CIC 278
CIC 277
CIC 276
CIC 275
CIC 274
CIC 273
CIC 272
CIC 271
CIC 270
CIC 269
CIC 268
CIC 267
CIC 266
CIC 265
CIC 264
CIC 263
CIC 262
CIC 261
CIC 260
CIC 259
CIC 258
CIC 257
CIC 256
CIC 255
CIC 254
CIC 253
CIC 252
CIC 251
CIC 250
CIC 249
CIC 248
CIC 247
CIC 246
CIC 245
CIC 244
CIC 243
CIC 242
CIC 241
CIC 240
CIC 239
CIC 238
CIC 237
CIC 236
CIC 235
CIC 234
CIC 233
CIC 232
CIC 231
CIC 230
CIC 229
CIC 228
CIC 227
CIC 226
CIC 225
CIC 224
CIC 223
CIC 222
CIC 221
CIC 220
CIC 219
CIC 218
CIC 217
CIC 216
CIC 215
CIC 214
CIC 213
CIC 212
CIC 211
CIC 210
CIC 209
CIC 208
CIC 207
CIC 206
CIC 205
CIC 204
CIC 203
CIC 202
CIC 201
CIC 200
CIC 199
CIC 198
CIC 197
CIC 196
CIC 195
CIC 194
CIC 193
CIC 192
CIC 191
CIC 190
CIC 189
CIC 188
CIC 187
CIC 186
CIC 185
CIC 184
CIC 183
CIC 182
CIC 181
CIC 180
CIC 179
CIC 178
CIC 177
CIC 176
CIC 175
CIC 174
CIC 173
CIC 172
CIC 171
CIC 170
CIC 169
CIC 168
CIC 167
CIC 166
CIC 165
CIC 164
CIC 163
CIC 162
CIC 161
CIC 160
CIC 159
CIC 158
CIC 157
CIC 156
CIC 155
CIC 154
CIC 153
CIC 152
CIC 151
CIC 150
CIC 149
CIC 148
CIC 147
CIC 146
CIC 145
CIC 144
CIC 143
CIC 142
CIC 141
CIC 140
CIC 139
CIC 138
CIC 137
CIC 136
CIC 135
CIC 134
CIC 133
CIC 132
CIC 131
CIC 130
CIC 129
CIC 128
CIC 127
CIC 126
CIC 125
CIC 124
CIC 123
CIC 122
CIC 121
CIC 120
CIC 119
CIC 118
CIC 117
CIC 116
CIC 115
CIC 114
CIC 113
CIC 112
CIC 111
CIC 110
CIC 109
CIC 108
CIC 107
CIC 106
CIC 105
CIC 104
CIC 103
CIC 102
CIC 101
CIC 100
CIC 99
CIC 98
CIC 97
CIC 96
CIC 95
CIC 94
CIC 93
CIC 92
CIC 91
CIC 90
CIC 89
CIC 88
CIC 87
CIC 86
CIC 85
CIC 84
CIC 83
CIC 82
CIC 81
CIC 80
CIC 79
CIC 78
CIC 77
CIC 76
CIC 75
CIC 74
CIC 73
CIC 72
CIC 71
CIC 70
CIC 69
CIC 68
CIC 67
CIC 66
CIC 65
CIC 64
CIC 63
CIC 62
CIC 61
CIC 60
CIC 59
CIC 58
CIC 57
CIC 56
CIC 55
CIC 54
CIC 53
CIC 52
CIC 51
CIC 50
CIC 49
CIC 48
CIC 47
CIC 46
CIC 45
CIC 44
CIC 43
CIC 42
CIC 41
CIC 40
CIC 39
CIC 38
CIC 37
CIC 36
CIC 35
CIC 34
CIC 33
CIC 32
CIC 31
CIC 30
CIC 29
CIC 28
CIC 27
CIC 26
CIC 25
CIC 24
CIC 23
CIC 22
CIC 21
CIC 20
CIC 19
CIC 18
CIC 17
CIC 16
CIC 15
CIC 14
CIC 13
CIC 12
CIC 11
CIC 10
CIC 9
CIC 8
CIC 7
CIC 6
CIC 5
CIC 4
CIC 3
CIC 2
CIC 1


Al Nofi's CIC
  Issue #02, July 21, 1998  
  This Issue...
  • Infinite Wisdom
  • la Triviata
  • Short Rounds
    • Infantry Missile Weapons in the Renaissance
    • Napoleon III Bridges the Ticino
    • Officer’s Compensation, the U.S. Army, 1821
    • James A. Garfield: Soldier, Spymaster, President
    • US Maritime Commission Ship Designations
  • Old Soldier’s Stories: An Incident During the Naval Battle of Santiago, 1898.

 

Infinite Wisdom

"Let trifles go; march!"

Darius N. Couch, Major General, U.S. Volunteers, 1861-1865

 

La Triviata

  • Chaplains in the Austro-Hungarian kaiserlich-und-koniglich Army were required, as officers, to wear swords when in uniform, but had, in compensation, the privilege of engaging in duels.
  • During the early part of World War I Germany had considerable success smuggling arms to Turkey by concealing them inside beer barrels which could then be shipped across neutral Romania, until one day when a thirsty Romanian railroad employee attempted to wet his whistle.
  • The Order of Victory of the soi disant Soviet Union, created on November 8, 1943, for award to senior Allied and Russian military personnel, was undoubtedly the most expensive military decoration in history, consisting as it did of a two-inch platinum star enameled in blue and red and studded with 135 diamonds.
  • During the Swedish attempt to storm the fortified Russian village of Veprik, on January 7, 1709, the fighting grew so intense that the defenders resorted to pouring their boiling breakfast porridge on their assailants.
  • When the German submarine U-459 shot down an RAF "Wellington" bomber in the Bay of Biscay on July 24, 1943, the stricken airplane crashed on its deck, which detonated one of the depth charges it was carrying, thus causing the u-boat to sink.
  • Having received from his king, Frederick the Great, an ill-conceived order at the Battle of Zorndorf (August 25, 1768), Prussian General Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz replied "Tell His Majesty that my head will be at his disposal after the battle, but that so long as the battle lasts I intend to use it in his service," and did what he thought best, thereby winning the battle.
  • The year 183 B.C. was a bad one for generals; Not only did Hannibal of Carthage, greatest general of the age, die, but also the Roman Scipio Africanus, the only man who ever beat him, and Philopoemon, the greatest Greek general of the time.
  • Although blimps only accounted for two enemy submarines no blimp-escorted convoy in either world war ever lost a ship to submarine attack.>Between 1914 and 1918 the number of machine guns in the German Army increased by 2,000 percent, rising from approximately 4,000 to over 80,000.

 

Short Rounds

Infantry Missile Weapons in the Renaissance

By 1500 infantrymen had three different missile weapons available to them. There was the arquebus, a relatively light firearm manageable by one man, as well as the very common crossbow, and the longbow, which was mostly limited to use by the English. Technically the arquebus was inferior to both the other two weapons in range, accuracy, and rate of fire, while the longbow was generally superior to the crossbow.

Characteristics of Infantry Missile Weapons, c. 1500
WeaponWeightProj Wt"MV"KERPMRange
(kg)(grms)(m/sec)(jls)(m)
Arquebus6.5453020125
Crossbow3.5125451271 - 250
Longbow3.07545762 - 650
Notes: Actual figures would have varied greatly from piece to piece due to the very serious lack of standardization that existed. Weight is that of the weapon proper, in kilograms, without ancillary equipment. In the case of the arquebus, such equipment frequently included a light stand in addition to tools for servicing the weapon. Proj Wt, is the weight of the missile, in grams. "MV", is the "muzzle velocity", or speed of the projectile as it leaves the weapon, expressed in meters per second. The higher this figure, the more accurate the weapon is likely to be. KE, is the kinetic energy possessed by the projectile as it leaves the weapon, expressed in joules, which suggests its hitting power . RPM is the number of rounds it was possible to fire per minute, with the lower figure being the sustainable rate of fire and the higher, the maximum. Range is the distance at which the weapon could reasonably be expected to be effective, expressed in meters. Maximum range was many times that given, though accuracy would deteriorate markedly.

The inferiority of the arquebus to the other two weapons was actually even greater than the data suggest. Since it was subject to fouling due to the build up of unburnt powder in the barrel, the effective range of the arquebus tended to decay after a few rounds. So it would certainly be reasonable to conclude that the arquebus was in every way inferior to the two older weapons. Technically, this was precisely the case.

But the arquebus possessed several advantages over its two rivals.

Relatively speaking the arquebus was cheaper than either the longbow, which had to be meticulously handcrafted from yew, and the crossbow, which required equally meticulous workmanship and rather expensive steel as well. The arquebus could be mass-produced by a foundry in fairly cheap cast iron. In addition, while the range, accuracy, and effectiveness of an arquebus round were inferior to those of the other weapons, an arquebusier could carry more ammunition than either of his competitors. Arquebus ammo weighed less than arrows or crossbow bolts, even after adding in the powder charge.
Rounds in Three Kilograms of Ammunition
WeaponRound
Arquebus50
Crossbow24
Longbow40

As a result of this difference in ammunition weight, an arquebusier could sustain fire longer than either a crossbowman or a longbowman. And ultimately it was sustained fire that won battles, more than accurate fire.
More...

 

© 1998 - 2014 StrategyWorld.com. All rights Reserved.
StrategyWorld.com, StrategyPage.com, FYEO, For Your Eyes Only and Al Nofi's CIC are all trademarks of StrategyWorld.com
Privacy Policy