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Procurement: The Last Of The Lakotas
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May 29, 2013: Because of budget cuts the U.S. Army has stopped buying the twin engine UH-72A ("Lakota") Light Utility Helicopters. Six months ago the army ordered another 34 Lakotas for $5.4 million each. Additional electronics and anti-missile systems add several millions to the cost per chopper. With that order the army has bought 312 of the 347 UH-72As it plans on getting. Most have already been delivered and apparently no more will be ordered, which means at least 35 Lakotas will not arrive.

Built by European firm EADS, the UH-72A is a militarized version of the EC145, a helicopter long popular with law enforcement agencies, including the FBI. The EC145 was introduced nine years ago and has been very popular with its users. The UH-72A purchase is a side effect of the cancellation of the Comanche scout helicopter in 2004 (mainly because of constantly increasing costs). Comanche was perceived as too expensive and complex. The UH-72A mainly replaces the few remaining UH-1 (“Huey”) helicopters, which have been retired because of old age.

The UH-72A has about the same capacity as the UH-1, despite its smaller size. The 3.6 ton UH-72A has a top speed of 260 kilometers an hour and a max range of 660 kilometers. Average endurance per sortie is about two hours. The helicopter has a crew of two and can carry up to eight passengers or about three-quarters of a ton of cargo or weapons. The UH-72A has been popular with its users and has had a readiness (for flying) rate of 90 percent.

Next Article → INFORMATION WARFARE: Arabs Provide Target Practice For Israeli Hackers