Infantry: Exercising For Combat

Archives

August 26,2008:  Last month, the U.S. Army changed its physical training (PT) to more closely reflect the needs of combat. Instead of long distance running, sit-ups and push-ups, the new training emphasizes sprinting, agility and the kind of strength needed to carry weapons and equipment in combat. The new training also uses a twelve month physical training cycle that peaks when troops are deploying to a combat zone, or, in peacetime, doing a year or more of "ready for deployment" status. The more advanced stages of the new physical training has troops doing the drills in full combat equipment. That won't be a problem, because the exercises they will be doing are the same kinds of moves they will make in combat. This month, the U.S. Marine Corps announced a similar program, and for the same reason.

All this is not a new idea. It first showed up over sixty years ago, during World War II, when army surveys of troops showed that combat veterans wish their training had emphasized more physical training, and more realistic physical training. The brass didn't get it back then, and after several more attempts, the combat troops have finally gotten physical training that prepares them for combat.

The new army physical training manual is being boiled down from 645 pages to a hundred pages, and will be distributed by mid-2009. The new marine program starts this year, in the form of a new "combat fitness test" the involves lifting, running and maneuvering as one would in combat.

 

 


Article Archive

Infantry: Current 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 


X

ad
0
20

Help Keep Us Soaring

We need your help! Our subscription base has slowly been dwindling. We need your help in reversing that trend. We would like to add 20 new subscribers this month.

Each month we count on your subscriptions or contributions. You can support us in the following ways:

  1. Make sure you spread the word about us. Two ways to do that are to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  2. Subscribe to our daily newsletter. We’ll send the news to your email box, and you don’t have to come to the site unless you want to read columns or see photos.
  3. You can contribute to the health of StrategyPage. A contribution is not a donation that you can deduct at tax time, but a form of crowdfunding. We store none of your information when you contribute..
Subscribe   Contribute   Close