CIC 477

Past Issues
CIC 476
CIC 475
CIC 474
CIC 473
CIC 472
CIC 471
CIC 470
CIC 469
CIC 468
CIC 467
CIC 466
CIC 465
CIC 464
CIC 463
CIC 462
CIC 461
CIC 460
CIC 459
CIC 458
CIC 457
CIC 456
CIC 455
CIC 454
CIC 453
CIC 452
CIC 451
CIC 450
CIC 449
CIC 448
CIC 447
CIC 446
CIC 445
CIC 444
CIC 443
CIC 442
CIC 441
CIC 440
CIC 439
CIC 438
CIC 437
CIC 436
CIC 435
CIC 434
CIC 433
CIC 432
CIC 431
CIC 430
CIC 429
CIC 428
CIC 427
CIC 426
CIC 425
CIC 424
CIC 423
CIC 422
CIC 421
CIC 420
CIC 419
CIC 418
CIC 417
CIC 416
CIC 415
CIC 414
CIC 413
CIC 412
CIC 411
CIC 410
CIC 409
CIC 408
CIC 407
CIC 406
CIC 405
CIC 404
CIC 403
CIC 402
CIC 401
CIC 400
CIC 399
CIC 398
CIC 397
CIC 396
CIC 395
CIC 394
CIC 393
CIC 392
CIC 391
CIC 390
CIC 389
CIC 388
CIC 387
CIC 386
CIC 385
CIC 384
CIC 383
CIC 382
CIC 381
CIC 380
CIC 379
CIC 378
CIC 377
CIC 375
CIC 374
CIC 373
CIC 372
CIC 371
CIC 370
CIC 369
CIC 368
CIC 367
CIC 366
CIC 365
CIC 364
CIC 363
CIC 362
CIC 361
CIC 360
CIC 359
CIC 358
CIC 357
CIC 356
CIC 355
CIC 354
CIC 353
CIC 352
CIC 351
CIC 350
CIC 349
CIC 348
CIC 347
CIC 346
CIC 345
CIC 344
CIC 343
CIC 342
CIC 341
CIC 340
CIC 339
CIC 338
CIC 337
CIC 336
CIC 335
CIC 334
CIC 333
CIC 332
CIC 331
CIC 330
CIC 329
CIC 328
CIC 327
CIC 326
CIC 325
CIC 324
CIC 323
CIC 322
CIC 321
CIC 320
CIC 319
CIC 318
CIC 317
CIC 316
CIC 315
CIC 314
CIC 313
CIC 312
CIC 311
CIC 310
CIC 309
CIC 308
CIC 307
CIC 306
CIC 305
CIC 304
CIC 303
CIC 302
CIC 301
CIC 300
CIC 299
CIC 298
CIC 297
CIC 296
CIC 295
CIC 294
CIC 293
CIC 292
CIC 291
CIC 290
CIC 289
CIC 288
CIC 287
CIC 286
CIC 285
CIC 284
CIC 283
CIC 282
CIC 281
CIC 280
CIC 279
CIC 278
CIC 277
CIC 276
CIC 275
CIC 274
CIC 273
CIC 272
CIC 271
CIC 270
CIC 269
CIC 268
CIC 267
CIC 266
CIC 265
CIC 264
CIC 263
CIC 262
CIC 261
CIC 260
CIC 259
CIC 258
CIC 257
CIC 256
CIC 255
CIC 254
CIC 253
CIC 252
CIC 251
CIC 250
CIC 249
CIC 248
CIC 247
CIC 246
CIC 245
CIC 244
CIC 243
CIC 242
CIC 241
CIC 240
CIC 239
CIC 238
CIC 237
CIC 236
CIC 235
CIC 234
CIC 233
CIC 232
CIC 231
CIC 230
CIC 229
CIC 228
CIC 227
CIC 226
CIC 225
CIC 224
CIC 223
CIC 222
CIC 221
CIC 220
CIC 219
CIC 218
CIC 217
CIC 216
CIC 215
CIC 214
CIC 213
CIC 212
CIC 211
CIC 210
CIC 209
CIC 208
CIC 207
CIC 206
CIC 205
CIC 204
CIC 203
CIC 202
CIC 201
CIC 200
CIC 199
CIC 198
CIC 197
CIC 196
CIC 195
CIC 194
CIC 193
CIC 192
CIC 191
CIC 190
CIC 189
CIC 188
CIC 187
CIC 186
CIC 185
CIC 184
CIC 183
CIC 182
CIC 181
CIC 180
CIC 179
CIC 178
CIC 177
CIC 176
CIC 175
CIC 174
CIC 173
CIC 172
CIC 171
CIC 170
CIC 169
CIC 168
CIC 167
CIC 166
CIC 165
CIC 164
CIC 163
CIC 162
CIC 161
CIC 160
CIC 159
CIC 158
CIC 157
CIC 156
CIC 155
CIC 154
CIC 153
CIC 152
CIC 151
CIC 150
CIC 149
CIC 148
CIC 147
CIC 146
CIC 145
CIC 144
CIC 143
CIC 142
CIC 141
CIC 140
CIC 139
CIC 138
CIC 137
CIC 136
CIC 135
CIC 134
CIC 133
CIC 132
CIC 131
CIC 130
CIC 129
CIC 128
CIC 127
CIC 126
CIC 125
CIC 124
CIC 123
CIC 122
CIC 121
CIC 120
CIC 119
CIC 118
CIC 117
CIC 116
CIC 115
CIC 114
CIC 113
CIC 112
CIC 111
CIC 110
CIC 109
CIC 108
CIC 107
CIC 106
CIC 105
CIC 104
CIC 103
CIC 102
CIC 101
CIC 100
CIC 99
CIC 98
CIC 97
CIC 96
CIC 95
CIC 94
CIC 93
CIC 92
CIC 91
CIC 90
CIC 89
CIC 88
CIC 87
CIC 86
CIC 85
CIC 84
CIC 83
CIC 82
CIC 81
CIC 80
CIC 79
CIC 78
CIC 77
CIC 76
CIC 75
CIC 74
CIC 73
CIC 72
CIC 71
CIC 70
CIC 69
CIC 68
CIC 67
CIC 66
CIC 65
CIC 64
CIC 63
CIC 62
CIC 61
CIC 60
CIC 59
CIC 58
CIC 57
CIC 56
CIC 55
CIC 54
CIC 53
CIC 52
CIC 51
CIC 50
CIC 49
CIC 48
CIC 47
CIC 46
CIC 45
CIC 44
CIC 43
CIC 42
CIC 41
CIC 40
CIC 39
CIC 38
CIC 37
CIC 36
CIC 35
CIC 34
CIC 33
CIC 32
CIC 31
CIC 30
CIC 29
CIC 28
CIC 27
CIC 26
CIC 25
CIC 24
CIC 23
CIC 22
CIC 21
CIC 20
CIC 19
CIC 18
CIC 17
CIC 16
CIC 15
CIC 14
CIC 13
CIC 12
CIC 11
CIC 10
CIC 9
CIC 8
CIC 7
CIC 6
CIC 5
CIC 4
CIC 3
CIC 2
CIC 1

Short Rounds

Teddy Roosevelt Volunteers for France

In March and April of 1917, as it became clear the U.S. would soon enter World War I against Germany, former President Theodore Roosevelt came up with the idea of raising a division of volunteers for service in France. With his usual energy, he immediately began contacting potential supporters, getting his old “Rough Rider” buddy Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, formerly chief-of-staff of the army and a leading spokesman for “Preparedness,” to accept its command and commitments from many prominent Americans to serve.

With Wood’s assistance, Teddy approached the War Department with his idea. But Army Chief-of-Staff Hugh Scott, who like many senior officers disliked Wood, nixed the notion, noting that the Army General Staff was committed to fielding a conscript force (so committed, in fact, that they not only federalized the National Guard, but eventually actually drafted everyone in it). 

So on April 10, 1917, just three days after Congress had issued a declaration of war against Germany, Roosevelt visited the White House to make his pitch directly to President Woodrow Wilson.

Roosevelt explained that the proposed volunteer division would be representative of the American people, to symbolize national unity. Since it was to be raised using the contingency T/O&E outlined in the National Defense Act of 1916, there would be nine infantry regiments. Roosevelt proposed that some of these be recruited from particular ethnic groups, including one regiment of German-Americans, to demonstrate the commitment of these immigrants and their children to the war effort, and another of African-Americans serving under white officers. Other regiments would be regionally recruited, including regiments from New England, the West, and so forth, with the Southern one to be commanded by members of the Lee and Jackson families. 

Adding that many young army officers had already agreed to serve with these volunteers, which was probably correct, Teddy claimed he could get his troops to the Front in France by September 1st, which was wildly optimistic

Now Wilson hated Roosevelt, and was certainly not going to do anything that would enhance the man's military reputation, and prospects for making another presidential bid in 1920. So he rejected Roosevelt's proposals, insisting that he had to rely on the better judgment of the leaders of the Army.

Although greatly disappointed, Roosevelt threw himself into war work, while planning a comeback for 1920, only to die in early 1919 of exhaustion, the lingering effects of various tropical ailments he had acquired while in the Amazon jungles, and a broken heart over the death of his some Quentin in combat over France.

Note: The 1916 TO&E. In addition to nine infantry regiments of 3,550 troops each, organized into three brigades, the proposed division was to have a brigade of three field artillery regiments, for a total of 4,600 Red Legs, a full cavalry regiment of 1,500 sabers, an engineer regiment of 1,700, and divisional trains totaling some 3,000 more. The result was a formation that comprised no less than 40,000 men. In the event, the War Department cut the division to four regiments in two brigades, plus three battalions of machine gunners, but, after dropping the cavalry regiment entirely, left the rest of the T/O&E more or less intact, for a division of 28,000 men on paper, still much larger than contemporary European infantry divisions, which were running at about 12,000 when at full strength.

 

"Serve the Veal"

During a drinking bout in the 1820s, some officers of the French Royal Army began discussing gluttony. Various among them described heroic feats of piggery that they had witnessed, often to expressions of doubt on the part of their comrades. But when one of them asserted that there was a soldier in his regiment who could probably eat a whole calf at one sitting, the doubters became quite vocal. Nevertheless, the officer stood by his assertion. Naturally, someone soon offered a substantial wager, which was accepted. 

It took a few days to make appropriate arrangements. The officer got the soldier to agree to take part. He then engaged the services of a local restaurant, and with the staff planned an elaborate menu. In what seems very much like an episode of Iron Chef, the officer and the restaurant staff came up with a large variety of dishes, all built around the "theme" ingredient, veal, so that the soldier’s palate would not become bored while working his way through the calf.

On the appointed day, the soldier, his officer, and the other members of the officers’ mess, convened at the restaurant. The chefs began bringing out dish after dish. And for dish after dish, the soldier dug in with great gusto. As those who had bet against him looked on in astonishment, plate after plate disappeared, and yet still the man kept going.

After about the seventh or eight dish, the soldier whispered to the officer, “Ah, ça mon capitane, I think it is time for them to serve the veal, otherwise I cannot answer for my being able to win your bet for you.”

Amazingly, the man had thought the flight of dishes which he had already consumed were merely intended to whet his appetite! 

Hearing that, the officer’s comrades – having seen the better part of a calf already disappear and the man still prepared to eat more – agreed to pay up at once.

 


© 1998 - 2020 StrategyWorld.com. All rights Reserved.
StrategyWorld.com, StrategyPage.com, FYEO, For Your Eyes Only and Al Nofi's CIC are all trademarks of StrategyWorld.com
Privacy Policy