CIC 472

Past Issues
CIC 471
CIC 470
CIC 469
CIC 468
CIC 467
CIC 466
CIC 465
CIC 464
CIC 463
CIC 462
CIC 461
CIC 460
CIC 459
CIC 458
CIC 457
CIC 456
CIC 455
CIC 454
CIC 453
CIC 452
CIC 451
CIC 450
CIC 449
CIC 448
CIC 447
CIC 446
CIC 445
CIC 444
CIC 443
CIC 442
CIC 441
CIC 440
CIC 439
CIC 438
CIC 437
CIC 436
CIC 435
CIC 434
CIC 433
CIC 432
CIC 431
CIC 430
CIC 429
CIC 428
CIC 427
CIC 426
CIC 425
CIC 424
CIC 423
CIC 422
CIC 421
CIC 420
CIC 419
CIC 418
CIC 417
CIC 416
CIC 415
CIC 414
CIC 413
CIC 412
CIC 411
CIC 410
CIC 409
CIC 408
CIC 407
CIC 406
CIC 405
CIC 404
CIC 403
CIC 402
CIC 401
CIC 400
CIC 399
CIC 398
CIC 397
CIC 396
CIC 395
CIC 394
CIC 393
CIC 392
CIC 391
CIC 390
CIC 389
CIC 388
CIC 387
CIC 386
CIC 385
CIC 384
CIC 383
CIC 382
CIC 381
CIC 380
CIC 379
CIC 378
CIC 377
CIC 375
CIC 374
CIC 373
CIC 372
CIC 371
CIC 370
CIC 369
CIC 368
CIC 367
CIC 366
CIC 365
CIC 364
CIC 363
CIC 362
CIC 361
CIC 360
CIC 359
CIC 358
CIC 357
CIC 356
CIC 355
CIC 354
CIC 353
CIC 352
CIC 351
CIC 350
CIC 349
CIC 348
CIC 347
CIC 346
CIC 345
CIC 344
CIC 343
CIC 342
CIC 341
CIC 340
CIC 339
CIC 338
CIC 337
CIC 336
CIC 335
CIC 334
CIC 333
CIC 332
CIC 331
CIC 330
CIC 329
CIC 328
CIC 327
CIC 326
CIC 325
CIC 324
CIC 323
CIC 322
CIC 321
CIC 320
CIC 319
CIC 318
CIC 317
CIC 316
CIC 315
CIC 314
CIC 313
CIC 312
CIC 311
CIC 310
CIC 309
CIC 308
CIC 307
CIC 306
CIC 305
CIC 304
CIC 303
CIC 302
CIC 301
CIC 300
CIC 299
CIC 298
CIC 297
CIC 296
CIC 295
CIC 294
CIC 293
CIC 292
CIC 291
CIC 290
CIC 289
CIC 288
CIC 287
CIC 286
CIC 285
CIC 284
CIC 283
CIC 282
CIC 281
CIC 280
CIC 279
CIC 278
CIC 277
CIC 276
CIC 275
CIC 274
CIC 273
CIC 272
CIC 271
CIC 270
CIC 269
CIC 268
CIC 267
CIC 266
CIC 265
CIC 264
CIC 263
CIC 262
CIC 261
CIC 260
CIC 259
CIC 258
CIC 257
CIC 256
CIC 255
CIC 254
CIC 253
CIC 252
CIC 251
CIC 250
CIC 249
CIC 248
CIC 247
CIC 246
CIC 245
CIC 244
CIC 243
CIC 242
CIC 241
CIC 240
CIC 239
CIC 238
CIC 237
CIC 236
CIC 235
CIC 234
CIC 233
CIC 232
CIC 231
CIC 230
CIC 229
CIC 228
CIC 227
CIC 226
CIC 225
CIC 224
CIC 223
CIC 222
CIC 221
CIC 220
CIC 219
CIC 218
CIC 217
CIC 216
CIC 215
CIC 214
CIC 213
CIC 212
CIC 211
CIC 210
CIC 209
CIC 208
CIC 207
CIC 206
CIC 205
CIC 204
CIC 203
CIC 202
CIC 201
CIC 200
CIC 199
CIC 198
CIC 197
CIC 196
CIC 195
CIC 194
CIC 193
CIC 192
CIC 191
CIC 190
CIC 189
CIC 188
CIC 187
CIC 186
CIC 185
CIC 184
CIC 183
CIC 182
CIC 181
CIC 180
CIC 179
CIC 178
CIC 177
CIC 176
CIC 175
CIC 174
CIC 173
CIC 172
CIC 171
CIC 170
CIC 169
CIC 168
CIC 167
CIC 166
CIC 165
CIC 164
CIC 163
CIC 162
CIC 161
CIC 160
CIC 159
CIC 158
CIC 157
CIC 156
CIC 155
CIC 154
CIC 153
CIC 152
CIC 151
CIC 150
CIC 149
CIC 148
CIC 147
CIC 146
CIC 145
CIC 144
CIC 143
CIC 142
CIC 141
CIC 140
CIC 139
CIC 138
CIC 137
CIC 136
CIC 135
CIC 134
CIC 133
CIC 132
CIC 131
CIC 130
CIC 129
CIC 128
CIC 127
CIC 126
CIC 125
CIC 124
CIC 123
CIC 122
CIC 121
CIC 120
CIC 119
CIC 118
CIC 117
CIC 116
CIC 115
CIC 114
CIC 113
CIC 112
CIC 111
CIC 110
CIC 109
CIC 108
CIC 107
CIC 106
CIC 105
CIC 104
CIC 103
CIC 102
CIC 101
CIC 100
CIC 99
CIC 98
CIC 97
CIC 96
CIC 95
CIC 94
CIC 93
CIC 92
CIC 91
CIC 90
CIC 89
CIC 88
CIC 87
CIC 86
CIC 85
CIC 84
CIC 83
CIC 82
CIC 81
CIC 80
CIC 79
CIC 78
CIC 77
CIC 76
CIC 75
CIC 74
CIC 73
CIC 72
CIC 71
CIC 70
CIC 69
CIC 68
CIC 67
CIC 66
CIC 65
CIC 64
CIC 63
CIC 62
CIC 61
CIC 60
CIC 59
CIC 58
CIC 57
CIC 56
CIC 55
CIC 54
CIC 53
CIC 52
CIC 51
CIC 50
CIC 49
CIC 48
CIC 47
CIC 46
CIC 45
CIC 44
CIC 43
CIC 42
CIC 41
CIC 40
CIC 39
CIC 38
CIC 37
CIC 36
CIC 35
CIC 34
CIC 33
CIC 32
CIC 31
CIC 30
CIC 29
CIC 28
CIC 27
CIC 26
CIC 25
CIC 24
CIC 23
CIC 22
CIC 21
CIC 20
CIC 19
CIC 18
CIC 17
CIC 16
CIC 15
CIC 14
CIC 13
CIC 12
CIC 11
CIC 10
CIC 9
CIC 8
CIC 7
CIC 6
CIC 5
CIC 4
CIC 3
CIC 2
CIC 1

Securing the Homeland, 1917-1918

During the Mexican Border Crisis of 1916, several states had invoked provisions of the National Defense Act of 1916 that provided authority to organize “state police or Constabulary.”  These were usually built around elements of the National Guard that had not been called into federal service, such as coast artillery units.  These forces worked out quite well.  As a result, when the U.S. moved toward a declaration of war against Germany, several states laid plans to form a temporary militia for service during the war.   When war came, on April 6, 1917, these states began implementing their plans as their National Guardsmen began entering federal service.  Altogether about half of the 48 states, and several of the territories, raised a home defense force.  Totaling about 100,000 men, these forces bore different names in different states, but have generally come to be known as “State Guard” or “State Defense Forces”.   

Recruited from men ineligible for military service by reason of age (too young or too old for the draft), moderate disability, or special exemption, most state guard forces were built around a cadre of old soldiers who were no longer fit for overseas service.  They served in much the same way as the National Guard did in peacetime, performing periodic training and being called up occasionally for special for duty.  But in New York, some of these troops performed almost full-time service.

The “New York Guard”, largest of the state guard forces, was authorized in April of 1917, and formally activated on August 3, 1917.  It reached a strength of 25 regiments and separate battalions (totaling some 20,000 men) distributed among four infantry brigades, an artillery brigade, a cavalry regiment, and supporting services. Three regiments of coast artillerymen served as infantry as needed.  Though most units were built around cadres of National Guardsmen, old soldiers, or members of The Veteran Corps of Artillery, an Historic Military Command, the bulk of the troops were new recruits.

On July 30, 1916, a bombing of Black Tom Island, New Jersey killed seven and injured hundreds and caused $22 million in damage to shipping, rail lines, cargo, and the Statue of Liberty. Blamed on German saboteurs (which was confirmed, post war), the bombing created fears that enemy agents could attack some of the state’s vital installations, notably the Erie Canal and the New York City water supply system.  As a result, in August of 1917, the state decided to activate two “provisional” regiments to provide full-time security for these facilities.

  • The 1st Provisional Regiment guarded the New York City water system.  This involved the complex of 267 vital installations -- reservoirs, pumping stations, water tunnels, gate valves, bridges, dams -- that stretched from the city over 150 miles into the heart of the state. 
  • The 2nd Provisional Regiment guarded the Erie Canal and the State Barge Canal between Albany and Niagara Falls, vital waterways for the movement of goods and materials between the Great Lakes and the port of New York, as well as railroad lines, bridges, and power plants across the upstate region.

These regiments (each consisting of 1250 men and officers, later increased to 1500) were built around a permanent cadre of experienced old soldiers with the balance of the personnel being filled by drafts on the other units of the NYG.  Troops would serve tours of several weeks with one of the regiments, and then rotate back to their home stations.   

Although promptly taking over from the National Guard beginning on August 10, 1917, the regiments faced many problems.  Equipment was in desperately short supply, as the National Guard had cleaned out the state's stockpiles.  Even the cots supplied to the men turned out to be more suitable for cub scouts than adults.  At first the only machine guns were Colts, while many men were initially issued the Krag-Jorgenson rifle, both dating from the Spanish-American War. Some even toted the .45 caliber "trap door" Springfield, originally introduced shortly after the Civil War.  Far more serious, as far as the troops were concerned, was that the state did issue their first paychecks until September 24th.

As time passed these deficiencies were resolved.  For example, the troops were issued modern Russian-model Remington rifles or the army's standard Springfield '03.  As they settled into their duties, the two regiments became rather proficient, each developing its own military culture.  The 1st Provisional, for example, had a bull dog for a mascot, a regimental march, a newspaper, and so forth. The First also had 550 summary courts martial and 25 general courts for infractions of regulations, including one man sentenced to 14 months hard labor for negligently shooting a teenager.

During the 19 months that the regiments were on duty, although there were no proven cases of sabotage, there were two serious incidents involving the discovery of explosives: a considerable cache of dynamite in one case and some vials of nitroglycerine found near the aqueduct in the other.  NYG personnel who were New York City police detectives investigated the incidents and determined only that the explosives had not been mislaid by any of the construction companies who had recently been working on the aqueduct.  It thus seems likely that the explosives had been cached by German saboteurs, anarchists, or some locals with a grudge against the New York City Water Board, which had exercised broad powers during the construction of the water system, at times condemning entire villages. 

Although the men who served with the regiments did not face hostile forces, they often endured considerable hardship. In addition to standing guard on isolated posts through an upstate New York winter, they suffered through the "Spanish Influenza" pandemic of 1918-1919, during which about 9 percent of the troops ended up on sick call, roughly double the normal winter disease rate.  The death rate from disease in the 1st Regiment was 30 from the flu and three from other illnesses, totaling about 2.5 percent of personnel (which was roughly "normal" for a stateside unit hit by the epidemic).  There were also three dead in firearms accidents, one in a railroad accident, and one by suicide.

The Armistice of November 11, 1918, brought the need for the NYG to an end.  The two provisional regiments were stood down on February 1, 1919, while the NYG was officially disbanded on January 16, 1923, not to be revived until July 10, 1940, when the National Guard was called up for an even greater emergency.

Shortly after the end of World War I, the Aqueduct Guard Citizens' Committee, which had been formed to provide support to the 1st Provisional Regiment, arranged for a monument to be erected at Sleepy Hollow to the memory of those who had died while on active duty.  A memorial service is held each year to commemorate their sacrifice.

 

"The Sleepy Queen’s"

For many years the 2nd (The Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot was nicknamed the “Sleepy Queen’s Royal Regiment.”

This curious nickname came about as a result of the escape of the French garrison from Almeida, Spain, on the night of May 10-11, 1811, of which we once took note in ". . . There is Nothing on Earth So Stupid as a Gallant Officer", back in April of 2009.

Despite allowing the French to escape, the men of the Queen’s Regiment, as well as those of the 4th and 36th Foot (all of whom had been tasked with keeping the enemy bottled up) had laid on an impressive pursuit, even abandoning much equipment in order to lighten their burdens. They actually managed to catch up with the French, albeit just as the latter were crossing the River Puerco into the safety of Marshal Massena’s army.

News of this untoward development was brought to Lt. Gen. Thomas Picton by an Irish officer.  Picton, who had a fiery temper, bellowed, “What the devil were the 2nd doing?”

“Faith,” replied the Irishman, “I suppose they were asleep.”

“Asleep!  What, then, was the 36th about?”

“Devil a one can tell, but maybe they were watching the 2nd, for fear somebody would waken them.”

Historical Note:  The 2nd (The Queen's Royal) Regiment was raised in 1661 by Henry Mordaunt, 2nd Earl of Peterborough and named after him.  Having been formed specifically to garrison Tangier (which had come into English possession as part of the dowry of Catherine of Braganza when she married King Charles II), it was for some years also known as the Tangier Regiment, and as “The Tangerines” for short.  Of course, like all English regiments of the times, it was also commonly known by its commander’s name.  In 1685, after King Charles died, the regiment was renamed the Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot.  In 1703 the regiment was renamed The Queen's Royal Regiment of Foot. In 1715, it became The Princess of Wales's Own Regiment of Foot after Caroline of Ansbach, wife to the then-Prince of Wales.  In 1727, when he ascended the throne as George II and Caroline became queen, the regiment became The Queen's Own. The regiment received the designation 2nd Foot in 1747 and, in 1751, was renamed The 2nd (The Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot.  This name lasted until 1881, when it became The Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. In 1921 the regiment was redesignated The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey) and in 1959 was amalgamated with The East Surrey Regiment to form The Queen's Royal Surrey Regiment. Since 1966 it has been part of The Queen’s Regiment.

 


© 1998 - 2019 StrategyWorld.com. All rights Reserved.
StrategyWorld.com, StrategyPage.com, FYEO, For Your Eyes Only and Al Nofi's CIC are all trademarks of StrategyWorld.com
Privacy Policy